(Source: ninjacousins, via kjroldan)

Timestamp: 1397770405

(Source: ninjacousins, via kjroldan)

niuleaf:

♡ note to self 

Timestamp: 1397770039

niuleaf:

♡ note to self 

(via skellaten)

Timestamp: 1397769793

(via skellaten)

ironxwilled:

sovietxprincess:

If you’re a guy who likes looking at pictures of naked girls but loses respect for a girl if she posts a naked picture of herself, you can get lost

How many times can I reblog this

(Source: princessxkaty, via teatray-inthesky)

Thank you Mr. Ck

(Source: yay--stefon, via creatingaquietmind)

Timestamp: 1397769691

Thank you Mr. Ck

(Source: yay--stefon, via creatingaquietmind)

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

blackmarketseance:

lookatthisfuckingpersonalblog:

blackmarketseance:

lookatthisfuckingpersonalblog:

blackmarketseance:

fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?

Allow me to answer that for you:

  • A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
    • "a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
    • "a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
    • "rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)
  • A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
  • Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
  • "Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
  • "An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
  • "Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
  • "Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
  • "Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
  • "Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
  • "Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)

Does that about answer it?

No it doesn’t answer the question at all. The question is why should you get paid when you aren’t ***working***.

So that babies don’t ***die***.  Because most people agree that that’s ***bad***.

*****that is not a businesses problem*******

****************************************you wanna like substantiate that somehow?*************************************************************

if you can’t understand a concept that simple good luck in the real world

O shit! How do you think the 160+ nations with paid leave are gonna feel when they hear they’re not part of the Real World? Do you wanna tell them?

Also, it’s only simple if you accept capitalism as an immutable part of human nature and not a social construct. Which is certainly easier but also most certainly incorrect.

Timestamp: 1397769619

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

blackmarketseance:

lookatthisfuckingpersonalblog:

blackmarketseance:

lookatthisfuckingpersonalblog:

blackmarketseance:

fact-tory:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

smellyanne:

lookatthisfuckinradfem:

Well, you know…shit.

why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks for doing nothing

you have a very, very odd definition of “doing nothing”.

Why would you pay someone for 26-51 weeks to care for a child (which is, as the previous comment states, in no way “doing nothing”)?

Allow me to answer that for you:

  • A study of 16 European countries from 1969-1994 found that “more generous paid leave is found to reduce deaths of infants and young children”; specifically, mathematical models found that
    • "a 10-week increase in paid leave is predicted to reduce infant mortality rates by between 2.5% and 3.4%,"
    • "a 10-week extension [in leave] is predicted to decrease post-neonatal deaths by 3.7 to 4.5% and child fatalities by 3.3 to 3.5%," and
    • "rights to a year of job-protected paid leave are associated with roughly a 20% decline in post-neonatal deaths and a 15% decrease in fatalities occurring between the first and fifth birthdays" (x)
  • A more recent study again of 16 European countries plus the USA and Japan found that “a 10-week extension in job-protected paid leave is predicted to decrease infant mortality rates, post-neonatal mortality rates, and child mortality rates by 2.6%, 4.1%, and 3%, respectively” but that these effects were not found if the leave was not job-protected or paid (x)
  • Women who receive pad leave are more likely to be employed, 54% more likely to report wage increases, and have a 39% lower likelihood of receiving public assistance and a 40% lower likelihood of receiving food stamps in the year after the child’s birth; men were also less likely to receive public assistance and food stamps if they received paid family leave (x)
  • "Maternity leave legislation in Europe effectively increases job protection and female labour market attachment" (x)
  • "An increase in leave duration is associated with a decrease in [post-partum] depressive symptoms until six months postpartum" (x)
  • "Shorter maternity leave (<12 weeks) was associated with higher maternal depression, lower parental preoccupation with the infant, less knowledge of infant development, more negative impact of birth on self-esteem and marriage, and higher career centrality" (x)
  • "Breastfeeding duration increased sharply, by over a month, and the proportion of mothers attaining the public health benchmark of 6 months exclusive breastfeeding increased by nearly 40% [after Canada increased the length of mandated paid maternity leave]" (x)
  • "Maternity leave led to small increases in birth weight, decreases in the likelihood of a premature birth, and substantial decreases in infant mortality for children of college-educated and married mothers, who were most able to take advantage of unpaid leave [in the US]" (x)
  • "Increased time with the child [due to mandated maternity leave in Norway] led to a 2.7 percentage points decline in high school dropout and a 5% increase in wages at age 30" (x)
  • "Children whose mothers return to work early are less likely to receive regular medical checkups and breastfeeding in the first year of life, as well as to have all of their DPT/Oral Polio immunisations (in approximately the first 18 months of life)" and "children whose mothers return full-time within 12 weeks are more likely to have externalising behaviour problems at age 4" (x)

Does that about answer it?

No it doesn’t answer the question at all. The question is why should you get paid when you aren’t ***working***.

So that babies don’t ***die***.  Because most people agree that that’s ***bad***.

*****that is not a businesses problem*******

****************************************you wanna like substantiate that somehow?*************************************************************

if you can’t understand a concept that simple good luck in the real world

O shit! How do you think the 160+ nations with paid leave are gonna feel when they hear they’re not part of the Real World? Do you wanna tell them?

Also, it’s only simple if you accept capitalism as an immutable part of human nature and not a social construct. Which is certainly easier but also most certainly incorrect.

Timestamp: 1397769331

(Source: 0xytocinn, via baconating)

Timestamp: 1397768979

(Source: 0xytocinn, via baconating)